JASDL
The Journal of the Analytical Sciences Digital Library
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Undergraduate Research

Submission guidelines

Please contact Mike Samideif you are interested in submitting an Undergraduate Research article for publication in JASDL.

Undergraduate Research
Determination of Tin in Ancient Bronze Coins by Flame Atomic Absorption SpectroscopyDetermination of Tin in Ancient Bronze Coins by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Author(s):Mary Kate Donais, Holly Jakubowski, Cindy Lebel    Contact
Submitted: February 20, 2008
Accepted: February 20, 2008

The provenance of ancient bronze coins can often be determined by analysis of the types and amounts of the major and minor metals used in the production of the bronze. In this report, the amount of tin in bronze coins excavated in Crete and Italy by students at Saint Anselm College was measured using acid digestion followed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The condition of the coins precluded visual identification. This method complements one developed earlier for lead. Additional procedures for other metals necessary to identify the coins are planned.

Examination of Methanol Permeability and Ionic Conductivity of EMI+ Doped Nafion MembraneExamination of Methanol Permeability and Ionic Conductivity of EMI+ Doped Nafion Membrane
Author(s):Sara E. Arbaugh, Amber K. Hodges, Steven W. Hutchcraft, and Radha Pyati    Contact
Submitted: December 18, 2006
Accepted: May 24, 2007

The ionic conductivity (ċ) and methanol permeability (P) for Nafion 112 and Nafion 115 membranes doped with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation (EMI+) are measured and compared with previously reported results for Nafion 117. High ionic conductivity and low methanol permeability are desirable for membranes of this type in applications such as the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). EMI+-doped membranes demonstrate lower methanol permeability than undoped ones, but ionic conductivity also decreases. In this study, the effects of temperature and film thickness (increasing from Nafion 112 to Nafion 117) on the permeability ratio (ċ/P) are addressed. Nafion 115 showed the highest permeability ratio among Nafion 112, 115, and 117 at room temperature. From 20 to 80 oC, methanol permeabilites demonstrate an Arrhenius dependence, while no significant differences are observed for increased film thickness.

Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Phosphate in Soil Extracts; Comparison of Mass Spectrometry, Colorimetry, and Inductively Coupled PlasmaMass Spectrometric Analysis for Phosphate in Soil Extracts; Comparison of Mass Spectrometry, Colorimetry, and Inductively Coupled Plasma
Author(s):Sobeck, Steven A. and Ebeling, Daniel D.    Contact
Submitted: April 4, 2007
Accepted: April 4, 2007

Three methods for the analysis of soil total phosphate (STP) are compared for samples extracted with either deionized water (DI) or ammonium oxalate (AmOx) solution. DI water extraction is used as an indicator of run-off susceptiblity, while AmOx, capable of extracting additional phosphorous from soil, is useful as an approximation of P available to plants. Colorimetry, mass spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometry were used for P analysis in reference samples, with amounts detected varying with the extraction method and chosen analysis technique. Reasons for these variations, including phosphorous speciation and matrix effects, are discussed.

A Study of the Effects of Various Flow Obstructions on Heterogeneous Catalysis and Micromixing in Biocatalytic MicrochannelsA Study of the Effects of Various Flow Obstructions on Heterogeneous Catalysis and Micromixing in Biocatalytic Microchannels
Author(s):Stephanie Wilson and Frank Jones    Contact
Submitted: March 1, 2007
Accepted: March 1, 2007

This study investigates the behavior of reacting flows in micro sized channels. These channels are coated with enzymes to act as catalysts. The incorporation of biologically active material into microreactors makes this technology applicable to such fields as renewable fuels, medicine, and pharmaceuticals. This study focuses on the optimization of conversion in microbioreactors through the addition of fixed packing particles. These particles are biologically active as well and serve to create static mixing in the process fluid. This is a numerical study which simulates flow and reaction using computational fluid dynamics software by ESI, Inc. Various packing configurations and locations are found to significantly affect the level of process fluid conversion. Some packing patterns are found to increase conversions up to 150% over that in empty channels.

The Potential of HUMACTBP2 (SE33) as a DNA Screening LocusThe Potential of HUMACTBP2 (SE33) as a DNA Screening Locus
Author(s):Kira Snyder, Kristen Johnson, Robin Shick, Jennifer Sears, Katherine Henkelman, Carol Ritter, and Lawrence Quarino    Contact
Submitted: March 1, 2007
Accepted: March 1, 2007

Forensic laboratories examining biological evidence are often faced with decisions on which and how many evidentiary samples to perform DNA analysis on. In most forensic DNA laboratories, genetic variation is determined at 13 different sites (loci) of the DNA molecule on evidentiary samples to determine a full DNA profile. Separating the important from the non-important biological evidentiary samples in a criminal investigation is often difficult and may only be done by testing multiple stains. A faster and more cost effective method of sample selection is to simply screen multiple biological stains with a single DNA locus to determine which stains are probative and warrant a full DNA profile. In this study, a genetic locus called SE33 was studied as a potential screening locus for these types of cases. As the study indicates, SE33 is suitable as a screening locus because it is highly variable (the chance of two unrelated people having the same SE33 type is very low) and can provide genetic information in samples compromised by biological factors very common in forensic samples.